Traumatic Brain Injury Linked to Stress & Suicidal Thoughts

by DailyRX
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Every year, more than half a million teenagers experience a serious concussion. These brain injuries often leave lasting damage, but to what extent? A recent study found that teenagers who have had a traumatic brain injury were at a significantly increased risk of being bullied, attempting or considering suicide, having elevated psychological stress and engaging in various poor conduct behaviors such as running away from home or starting a fight at school. The researchers believe that primary care doctors should be aware if their patients have had a traumatic brain injury and screen them for potential mental and behavioral problems. The lead author of … Continue reading

Do you Need to Supplement Vitamin D?

by Dr. Medulous
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Supplements are a simple way to get your daily dose of important vitamins and minerals. Vitamin D is usually included in most multivitamins, but its actual efficacy is matter of scientific debate. Different studies are drawing varied conclusions about the sunny Vitamin D. In a study published in the US National Library of Medicine, circulating Vitamin D through the subjects lowered the overall mortality rate of the over 30,000 participants, especially in older adults. The benefits seemed to affect the risks of cancer or cardiovascular disease, both of which are top killers in North America. Meanwhile several other studies have … Continue reading

Coronary Patients Also at Risk for Dental Health Issues

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People with heart disease often have to pay very close attention to their health. It’s possible that even dental health is closely associated with heart disease.   A recent study found that signs of dental disease, such as tooth loss and gum bleeding, were extremely common among coronary heart disease patients around the world. The researchers suggested that self-reported dental health could potentially help predict the risk of heart disease. The lead author of this study was Ola Vedin, MD, from the Department of Medical Sciences at Uppsala University in Sweden. The study included 15,828 adults from 39 countries around the world … Continue reading

More Television Time for Children Related to Reduced Amount of Sleep

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Sleep is very important to health, especially for children who are still physically developing. Anything that might interfere with sleep, such as TV, might lead to poor long-term habits. A recent study found that children tended to get slightly less sleep with the more TV they watched. The most dramatic drop in daily sleep time, however, was linked to having a TV in the bedroom for minority children.The authors suggested that reducing TV time and/or removing televisions from children’s bedrooms might help their sleep time. The study, led by Elizabeth Cespedes, of the Obesity Prevention Program at Harvard Medical School, looked at the … Continue reading

Tattoos Cover Up Signs of Cancer

by Dr. Medulous
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A new study suggests that getting tattoos can put you at high risk by disguising early signs of melanoma. Even though no link has been established between getting a tattoo and susceptibility to cancer, a large dark ink splotch can make it difficult to detect the initial stages of the disease. Experts say that people should routinely check their skin for new moles or existing moles that may have changed in shape or colour- a discovery that should be followed up with a trip to the dermatologist. People with tattoos would have a much harder time noticing any changes at … Continue reading

Blood Pressure Differences Predict Cardiovascular Trouble

by Dr. Medulous
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Next time you’re checking your blood pressure, measure twice. Researchers find that inconsistent blood pressure in different parts of your body is a reliable indicator of stroke and heart disease. New data has found that adults with a higher ISBPD (or interarm systolic blood pressure difference) are 38% more likely to experience a cardiac event. The study followed 3390 participants over an average of 13 years. The participants were over 40 years old and free of any prevalent cardiovascular disease. Each person’s blood pressure was measured in their right arm, left arm, right ankle and left ankle in order to find … Continue reading

Ohio Mumps Outbreaks Highlights Vaccination & Prevention

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April 4, 2014 / Author: Morgan Jones / Reviewed by: Joseph V. Madia, MD Beth Bolt, RPh Mumps is now a fairly rare occurrence in the US, thanks to routine vaccination programs. However, outbreaks can still occur, as some residents of one US state are seeing. An outbreak of mumps that started at The Ohio State University is growing, both on campus and in the wider community of Columbus, Ohio. Health officials are asking that the public check their vaccination records and stay home when ill. Mumps, which often causes symptoms like fever, headache, muscle aches and swollen salivary glands, is usually not severe, but can in … Continue reading

Education Critical in North American Child Battle Obesity

by Nelly Deutsch
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In the North American war on obesity, the score is currently: America 1, Canada 0, Mexico, 0. A federal US Study has found that obesity in children between 2-5 has plummeted 43% in the last ten years. The impact of this study is that it is the first time a decrease has been spotted, proving that just maybe all the nutritional programs being championed in schools are working their magic. At the same time, a similar study done in Canada has shown that if trends continue, one in five Canadians will be obese by 2019- putting serious stress on the … Continue reading

Cancer Overtakes AIDS as Top Killer in Developing Nations

by Dr. Medulous
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When people think of Africa, the spectre of AIDS often marches hand-in-hand with elephants and war. And while that epidemic is still very real and very much a factor in the developing nations of the continent, a new threat has overtaken AIDS as Africa’s number one killer – cancer. In the affluent west, we have become used to wearing pink, buying daffodils or growing a moustache all in the name of cancer awareness. For medical professionals in Africa, they face the conundrum that some languages don’t even have a word for cancer. As treatments for other diseases become more common … Continue reading

Miracle Cures on The Horizon for Baldness, Blindness & More!

by Dr. Medulous
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Whether it’s infertility, concussions or baldness medical advancements are making great strides in cures and procedures. Some might even call them… miraculous! Blood tests give hints to the brain Concussions have always been a tricky injury to diagnose the severity of, and it is hard to predict how long symptoms will last. In most cases doctors would have to rely on the patient’s description of their symptoms, along with cognitive and neurological testing, to try and pin-point how severe it is. But new research coming out of the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston and the University of Pittsburgh believe … Continue reading